North Carolina

  • April 24, 2024

    4th Circ. Revives Worker's Age Bias Suit Against IT Co.

    The Fourth Circuit on Wednesday reinstated a former information technology company worker's lawsuit alleging she was unlawfully fired and replaced by someone nearly 30 years her junior, saying a trial court held her to too high a standard when it threw out her case.

  • April 23, 2024

    Feds Urge Court To Admit Ex-VP Info In Mogul's Bribery Case

    Federal prosecutors have struck back against embattled insurance mogul Greg Linderg's attempt to keep evidence about a former employee's alleged involvement in a bribery scheme from a jury, telling the court that the employee's acquittal on related charges doesn't make evidence dealing with him inadmissible.

  • April 23, 2024

    NC Justices Urged To Reject Greg Lindberg Co.'s Review Bid

    North Carolina's insurance commissioner urged the state's supreme court to prevent a company controlled by insurance mogul Greg Lindberg from intervening in the liquidation proceedings of two of his life insurance companies, arguing a state appeals panel correctly held that an insurer's directors, but not shareholders, may intervene.

  • April 23, 2024

    Ex-Public Defender Wants 4th Circ. To End Wait In Bias Suit

    A former public defender suing the federal judiciary for allegedly failing to take her sexual harassment claims seriously asked the Fourth Circuit on Tuesday to force a federal judge's hand after more than four months without a ruling following a bench trial, saying a decision on her long-pending bid for a preliminary injunction is overdue.

  • April 23, 2024

    NC Felony Voting Law Struck Down As Unconstitutional

    A North Carolina federal judge has struck down the state's 147-year-old law making it a crime for convicted felons to vote, finding that the statute disproportionately targets Black voters and had been inconsistently enforced in violation of the U.S. Constitution.

  • April 23, 2024

    BofA Nears Deal Over 'Hidden' Wire Transfer Junk Fees

    Bank of America has agreed to resolve a proposed class action accusing it of tacking on $15 "junk fees" for incoming wire transfers, and a North Carolina federal judge on Monday gave the parties until May 24 to submit a motion for preliminary approval of the settlement.

  • April 22, 2024

    Feds Botched Building Contract Prices, Watchdog Reports

    Federal building overseers in the Southeast U.S. used distorted pricing for medium-term construction contracts that produced significantly inflated and unreasonably low-cost estimates, according to a government watchdog.

  • April 22, 2024

    NC Justice Dept. Seeks Early Win In Promotion Bias Suit

    The North Carolina Department of Justice urged a federal court to take its side in an attorney's lawsuit alleging she faced discrimination at the agency for being a Black woman, arguing that the white man who got the job for which she'd interviewed was the most qualified candidate.

  • April 22, 2024

    NC Chemical Biz Wants Help Covering $5M Site Cleanup

    A chemical company asked a North Carolina federal court on Monday to force other chemical makers, including a Koch Industries subsidiary, to contribute to the roughly $5 million cleanup of a contaminated site, contending the other companies owned or operated parts of the site for years.

  • April 22, 2024

    Opioid Marketer Completes $1.5M Damages Settlement With Del.

    Delaware's chancellor signed off Monday on a $1.5 million payment to the state by a company that helped Purdue Pharmaceuticals market its opioid products, the latest step in a $358 million, 50-state damages settlement reached with Publicis Health LLC.

  • April 22, 2024

    Lessee Axed From NC Doctor's Quarrel With Ex-Partner

    The North Carolina Business Court has purged a defendant from an ophthalmologist's lawsuit claiming his former partner has reneged on a settlement to buy out the ophthalmologist's half of the practice, finding the defendant wasn't a party to the settlement and can't now be bound to it.

  • April 22, 2024

    Senate OKs Permanent Status For 10 Fed. District Judgeships

    The U.S. Senate has unanimously passed a bill put forth by a bipartisan group of lawmakers that would transition 10 previously temporary district court judgeships in 10 states to permanent posts, including in Texas, California and Florida.

  • April 22, 2024

    Justices To Mull Atty Fees For Preliminary Injunctions

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday agreed to hear a case that could determine whether litigants can receive attorney fees for "prevailing" in a case by winning a preliminary injunction, despite never securing a final judgment.

  • April 22, 2024

    Justices Won't Probe Athlete's Interest In NCAA Eligibility

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday left in place a Fourth Circuit decision finding student athletes lack a business or property interest in their eligibility to play on the college level even though they can now be compensated for it.

  • April 19, 2024

    Enviro Groups Say Federal Plan Threatens At-Risk Bats

    A coalition of environmental groups sued the U.S. Forest Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Thursday in North Carolina federal court alleging that a plan to allow logging in the Nantahala and Pisgah national forests will harm endangered bats on the brink of extinction.

  • April 19, 2024

    Bankruptcy Bill Seeks To Aid Sex Abuse Victims

    A bill introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives would help sexual abuse victims by limiting the ability of their abusers to shield themselves by filing for bankruptcy, according to the bipartisan pair backing the proposed legislation.

  • April 19, 2024

    Ex-Defender Says High Court Ruling Backs Bias Claims

    A former assistant federal defender urged a North Carolina district court to consider a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling in her sexual harassment lawsuit, arguing the high court's decision backs her claims for employment discrimination against the federal judiciary.

  • April 19, 2024

    Hatteras Fund Investors Sue In Chancery After 95% Drop

    Stockholders in a series of funds managed by alternative investment boutique Hatteras Investment Partners LP have launched a proposed class action against the company's board in Delaware's Court of Chancery, alleging breaches of fiduciary duty in conjunction with the funds' liquidation.

  • April 19, 2024

    Off The Bench: NCAA Rules, Trans Athlete Win, NBA Pro's Ban

    In this week's Off The Bench, the NCAA formally lifted restrictions on athletes transferring schools and how they can receive name, image and likeness money, West Virginia's transgender sports ban is dealt a blow by the Fourth Circuit, and betting costs an NBA player his career.

  • April 19, 2024

    IQVIA Strikes Deal To Exit Ex-Workers' 401(k) Suit

    Healthcare technology company IQVIA has reached a settlement to resolve allegations from a 9,000-member class that it picked inferior and expensive investments for its $1.13 billion 401(k) plan, according to a filing in North Carolina federal court.

  • April 18, 2024

    LG Chem Wants NC Man's Exploding Battery Suit Tossed

    LG Chem Ltd. is urging a North Carolina federal court to throw out a man's suit alleging that he was injured when one of the company's lithium batteries exploded in his pocket, saying the court doesn't have jurisdiction over the South Korean company.

  • April 18, 2024

    Insurance Mogul Wants Ex-VP's Evidence Out Of Bribery Trial

    Embattled insurance mogul Greg Lindberg has asked a federal court to keep evidence concerning a former business partner out of his upcoming bribery trial, arguing that the partner's acquittal of criminal charges renders the information irrelevant.

  • April 18, 2024

    Gov't Urges Redo Of Opt-Out Ruling In Camp Lejeune Suits

    The federal government has asked the North Carolina federal court overseeing the litigation over contaminated water at the Camp Lejeune base to rethink its decision from two months ago to allow some plaintiffs to opt out of discovery pre-trial.

  • April 18, 2024

    AGs, Google Defend $700M Play Store Deal Ripped By Judge

    A group of state attorneys general and Google defended the proposed $700 million settlement both sides brokered in the states' antitrust suit against the company in December, telling a San Francisco federal judge that the deal is consistent with Ninth Circuit precedent and releases only a limited set of claims against Google for a seven-year period.

  • April 18, 2024

    4th Circ. Vacates Enviro Win In Mining Co. Permit Ruling

    The special receiver for a defunct mining company can transfer mining permits for a site formerly owned by Patriot Coal Corp., the Fourth Circuit ruled, finding that a West Virginia federal judge interpreted a consent decree providing for mine shutdown and cleanup too broadly.

Expert Analysis

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • A Look At FedNow Liability Allocation And A 4th Circ. Toss-Up

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    Dsu-Wei Yuen and Andrew Lorentz at Davis Wright break down the current legal requirements that are directly applicable to common electronic payment systems like FedNow and Automated Clearing House and how they could be affected by a decision in Studco v. 1st Advantage Credit Union, currently on appeal in the Fourth Circuit.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • An Overview Of Circuit Courts' Interlocutory Motion Standards

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    The Federal Arbitration Act allows litigants to file an immediate appeal from an order declining to enforce an arbitration agreement, but the circuit courts differ on the specific requirements for the underlying order as well as which motion must be filed, as demonstrated in several 2023 decisions, says Kristen Mueller at Mueller Law.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

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